Jewish and Halal Food Preparation (Nutrition 360)

How well do you know the mouths that you feed? From this video, you will learn more about
the Muslim and Jewish residents here in our cafeteria, and how to properly recognize,
store, and prepare their foods. Our Jewish and Muslim residents have some
important dietary restrictions. Those of the Jewish faith refrain from eating
single hooved animals, most birds of prey, scavenging birds, scaleless sea creatures,
amphibians, reptiles, insects, and any animals that do not chew their cud, such as pigs. These animals are not considered kosher, a
term that labels foods acceptable for consumption in Judaism. Animals that have not lived and been killed
in a kosher manner– as well as eggs or milk from an unkosher animal–are off limits. Muslims also have certain dietary restrictions. Similarly to Judaism, pork is also off limits
for Muslims, and they too require that their meat is slaughtered in a certain fashion. This method is called halal. What this means for you is that you will need
to be sure that all meat, dairy, and egg products, or food items containing meat, dairy, or egg
products are labeled as Kosher and Halal.

Kosher and Halal labels are shown here and
can be found on the food’s packaging. When storing kosher and halal foods, be careful
to store them in their own properly labeled containers and store them separately from
regular foods to prevent contamination from non-kosher and non-halal foods. Preparation of these foods can be a bit more
complicated. For both kosher and halal foods, care must
be taken to clean preparation stations and tools, such as knives, cutting boards, and
counters when switching between kosher, halal, and regular food preparation. In the case of kosher food preparation, meat,
poultry, and dairy products may not be mixed, as they are not to be eaten together, fish
and meat also cannot mix, but fish and dairy may be eaten together. Care must also be taken to ensure that only
kosher utensils, pots, pans, and plates are used in the preparation process. For halal foods, there are no requirements
beyond prevention of cross-contamination as discussed previously. As for service, when serving kosher and halal
food, be sure to label the food with the kosher and halal symbols presented earlier. Preparing kosher and halal foods is not hard! Jsut remember to check labels and avoid cross-contamination,
and you will be all set to feed the Jewish and Muslim residents!

As found on YouTube

Jewish and Halal Food Preparation (Nutrition 360)

PSA for Nutrition 360 by Elisabeth Bach, Jenna Gombeda, Gaby Disla, and Anna Aebli